John Carter

CARTER, JOHN (1929–1991). John Carter, jazz composer and clarinetist, was born in Fort Worth, Texas, on September 24, 1929. He was influenced by the music at his Baptist church and by recordings his parents owned of jazz greats, such as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, and Cab Calloway. Carter began playing clarinet at the age of twelve; he also played flute and saxophone. He performed with Ornette Coleman in Fort Worth. He received his B.A. in music in 1949 at Lincoln University in Jefferson, Missouri, and his M.A. at the University of Colorado in 1956. He taught music in the Fort Worth public schools from 1949 to 1961, when he secured a position as a traveling elementary school music teacher in Los Angeles. There he and Bobby Bradford, also from Texas, collaborated to form the New Art Jazz Ensemble. Some of their music was released as West Coast Hot in 1969. In Los Angeles, Carter opened a jazz establishment, Rudolph’s, where progressive musicians met. He was critics’ choice for best jazz clarinetist for most of the 1980s. Between 1985 and 1990 Carter composed and recorded Roots and Folklore: Episodes in the Development of American Folk Music, in five albums focused on African-Americansqv– Dauwhe (1985), Castles of Ghana (1985), Dance of the Love

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Ray Sharpe

    Ray Sharpe is an American R&B and rockabilly singer, guitarist, and songwriter. Many of his recordings, including his best-known, “Linda Lu”, are sometimes classed as rockabilly – he was described by one record producer as “the greatest white-sounding black dude ever”.[1] Born in Fort Worth, Texas, Sharpe grew up influenced by country as well as blues music. He learned guitar, influenced by Chuck Berry records, and in 1956 formed his own trio, Ray Sharpe and the Blues Whalers, with Raydell Reese (piano) and Cornelius Bell (drums), and they became popular playing rock and roll in Fort Worth clubs.[2] His recording career started in Phoenix, Arizona in April 1958, when Lee Hazlewood produced his single, “That’s the Way I Feel” / “Oh, My Baby’s Gone”. His second record, “Linda Lu”[3] / “Monkey’s Uncle” – both sides written by Sharpe, produced by Hazlewood, and featuring Duane Eddy and Sharpe on guitar, Al Casey on rhythm guitar – was much more successful. Recorded in May 1959, it reached No. 46 on the Billboard Hot 100 that year. Following its success, Sharpe appeared on American Bandstand and toured with a Dick Clark rock and roll package that also included LaVern Baker, Duane Eddy and The Coasters.[2] “Linda Lu” has subsequently been covered by many artists, including the Rolling Stones, The Kingsmen, Johnny Kidd and the Pirates, Flying Burrito Brothers, and Tom Jones. Subsequent single releases on a variety of record labels, including Hazlewood’s own Trey label, were less

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